Depression does not always mean
Beautiful girls shattering at the wrists
A glorified, heroic battle for your sanity
Or mothers that never got the chance to say good-bye

Sometimes depression means
Not getting out of bed for three days
Because your feet refuse to believe
That they will not shatter upon impact with the floor

Sometimes depression means
That summoning the willpower
To go downstairs and do the laundry
Is the most impressive thing you accomplish that week

Sometimes depression means
Lying on the floor staring at the ceiling for hours
Because you cannot convince your body
That it is capable of movement

Sometimes depression means
Not being able to write for weeks
Because the only words you have to offer the world
Are trapped and drowning and I swear to God I’m trying

Sometimes depression means
That every single bone in your body aches
But you have to keep going through the motions
Because you are not allowed to call in to work depressed

Sometimes depression means
Ignoring every phone call for an entire month
Because yes, they have the right number
But you’re not the person they’re looking for, not anymore

by “Alexandra” Tilton, NH (Teen Ink: November 2013 Issue)

(via livingthroughbooks)

1. Wash your sheets every two weeks, I promise you’ll sleep better.

2. If a boy breaks your heart, it’s okay to cry.

3. If a girl breaks your heart, it’s okay to cry.

4. School is important, but there are many things you can’t learn in a classroom. Pursue them.

5. Find your passion, and run with it.

6. No, you don’t need to lose weight.

7. You are beautiful without make up.

8. You are beautiful with make up.

9. Being a good person will never go out of style

10. Buy yourself flowers if you’re feeling sad.

11. Getting enough sleep is very important.

12. Drinking water has so many benefits

13. Believe in fairytales, believe in love, and allow no one to steal your magic.

14. Reading is good for the soul.

15. I am not here to judge you, but I will always support what I think is best for you.

16. I appreciate you.

17. I am proud of you.

18. Even on your worst days, you will never disappoint me.

19. I love you no matter what.

19 Things I Will Tell My Daughter (via brennanat)

Life lessons.

(via gettingahealthybody)

(via livingthroughbooks)

redefiningfood:

I had avocado toast for my last breakfast in Bangkok, and the perfect Avocado Toast is not a humble affair. It is a symphony of tomato tepanade topped with thick slices of avocado, seasoned with salt, pepper, chilli flakes, a liberal squeeze of lemon and finally a dash of tabasco sauce, all on toasted whole seed sprouted bread. When time is limited, we have to make the moments we have memorable for ourselves, and a little time and effort is never misplaced when making food memorable. 

redefiningfood:

I had avocado toast for my last breakfast in Bangkok, and the perfect Avocado Toast is not a humble affair. It is a symphony of tomato tepanade topped with thick slices of avocado, seasoned with salt, pepper, chilli flakes, a liberal squeeze of lemon and finally a dash of tabasco sauce, all on toasted whole seed sprouted bread. When time is limited, we have to make the moments we have memorable for ourselves, and a little time and effort is never misplaced when making food memorable. 

(via beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood)

… to read, we need a certain kind of silence, an ability to filter out the noise. That seems increasingly elusive in our overnetworked society, where every buzz and rumor is instantly blogged and tweeted, and it is not contemplation we desire but an odd sort of distraction, distraction masquerading as being in the know. In such a landscape, knowledge can’t help but fall prey to illusion, albeit an illusion that is deeply seductive, with its promise that speed can lead us to more illumination, that it is more important to react than to think deeply, that something must be attached to every bit of time. Here, we have my reading problem in a nutshell, for books insist we take the opposite position, that we immerse, slow down.

David L. Ulin, The Lost Art of Reading (via litverve)